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. >> america is concerned about pakistan. following their success in the osama bin laden operation, people are wanting to the ideas of stopping the terrorists in their tracks. >> pakistan might prove to be the major challenge in the so- called war on terror. the rising confidence of extremist groups is making observers extremely nervous, especially as the country is home to what the jihadists like to call the islamic bomb. the last time the world was jittery about security in pakistan was nearly a decade ago just after the 9/11 attacks when washington developed an emergency plans. we have been told that these plans are coming once again and they are contemplating the country expanding their nuclear arsenal at a time of weakness. these are the images behind the latest attack of nerves, a naval base in karachi. they destroyed two u.s.-made spy planes in a well-executed operation which is believed to have received support from elements within the armed forces. >> the raid on that particular naval facility was unique in this sense that it was the first time that an organized group was able to
towards that group. >> interesting because in 2008, india blames elements within pakistan. do you think that there might be a coincidence in these attacks happening just months after the peace talks between india and pakistan started? >> it is inconceivable that india would have any role in this because india and pakistan are now engaged in a dialogue. the foreign ministers will be meeting shortly. pakistan is facing multiple threats. we have had an outbreak of sectarian violence. we know how involved they are. we have a pakistani taliban attack. we are at the point of a new low. the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable. >> what about indian intelligence gathering and security? there has been a number of cracks, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authority's confidence? >> there will be questions about another attack in mumbai. after 2008, there were major reviews within india within -- about internal security. in this case, there would be a very close examination of how close that india has responded. they have
that the gradually improving relations between pakistan and india are not given a dent from this attack? >> i think the indian government is being very cautious. i think they are not speculating and i think so it would be very early for me to speculate on why they decided to be very open-minded about this investigation. of course the 2008 attacks on mumbai, the indian government did accuse pakistan of having some involvement in this those attacks. the 2006 train bombings in the city happened in the rush hour, more than a dozen indian nationals arrested for that. it is very easy to -- there has been a lot of speculation and jumping to conclusions about the possibility of pakistan's involvement but the indian government is keeping an open mind. pakistan governments condemned the attacks shortly after they happened yesterday. indian opposition parties are pointing a finger in that direction but i think it is very early to draw any speculation about who might be behind this attack, particularly because they say they are still working on very limited intelligence. >> thank you very much indeed. the chin
pakistan. -- she went on to vow that the obama administration will not ease pressure on neighboring pakistan. >> this used to be rare. now they are routine. both countries are determined to strengthen their strategic global partnership, defense and regional security or on the agenda. the agreed to work closer together in afghanistan as the u.s. agreed to pull out its troops. hillary clinton praised the recent resumption of talks between india and pakistan. >> we think this is the most promising approach to encourage both sides to build more confidence between them and work to implement the kinds of steps that will demonstrate the improved atmosphere that is so necessary for us to deal with the underlying problem of terrorism. >> she also said that terrorism was on everyone's minds following last week's bombing of mumbai which killed 20 people. the attack revealed once again the vulnerability of the indian cities and the police who are investigating. the security agencies should work closer together to prevent future attacks. the focus of the next page of the visit will be on busines
to reintegrate in those areas. secondly, more broadly, put more pressure on pakistan, the biggest outside government supporter of the taliban. if they were to suddenly decide they wanted to cut a deal, that would put pressure on the taliban. unfortunately, we are not seeing across-the-board big three in all locations, nor we seeing pakistan put pressure on them -- a cross-led dashboard victory -- across-the-board- victory in all locations, nor are we seeing pakistan put pressure on them. we're seeing the taliban lose ground in the south. i suspect part of that is contesting areas that the taliban does -- >> thank you for coming in. the worst drought in decades is forcing thousands of families in east africa to walk for days to find refugee camps. the un says some very young children are dying before they ever get there. rain fell for the past three seasons. people are facing dire shortages of food, shelter, and health services. we are in a kenyan refugee camp, the largest of its kind in this world, for this story. >> day after day, mile after mile, they walked and walked. these are the pe
to pakistan. tensions were already high before the al qaeda leader osama bin laden was killed in a u.s. raid in an army raid. more recently, 100 military trainers have been expelled, and they threatened to shut down a c.i.a. base. our correspondent, aleem maqbool, is in islamabad, and earlier, i asked him how humiliating this is for pakistan given they need u.s. aid to help pay for security. >> we keep hearing leaks about various things that the american officials are accusing pakistan of doing. certainly the pakistanis feel very much under pressure. they do need the dollars, but not to the extent that we might think, because they do get a large proportion -- the pakistani army gets a large proportion of the domestic budget here, but it is the humiliation more than anything that will help the pakistani army. and yes, the two sides do need each other. nobody's talking about breaking up completely, but it's whether this will have the desired effect that washington wants or not, and that is something we simply can't tell right now. >> aleem maqbool. in syria, supporters of the government and so
.s. raid into pakistan that led to the killing of osama bin laden. you also would do away with, in essence, the c.i.a. why did you oppose the raid and what would you put in the place of it? >> well, the question to me was i was just saying it could be done differently. i mean, all this does was raise questions and i predicted that this would lead to a lot of resentment and think of the chaos in pakistan and the mess that we have. we both bomb them and give them money and people hate their own government because their own government's a puppet of ours. my frustration with bin laden was it took so long. >> woodruff: and the c.i.a., you would.... >> couric: i don't think the c.i.a. should be a military arm of the government dropping bombs secretly. you can't even separate the two. you don't even know who is controlling the bombing of this country now. >> woodruff: a couple questions about your campaign. you have a son who was elected to the united states senate rand paul from the state of kentucky. this is your third try for president. there was some talk he was looking at running for preside
in iraq after the withdrawal deadline in december. officials in pakistan today played down a u.s. decision to suspend $800 million in military aid. u.s. officials confirmed it on sunday. but, a pakistani spokesman insisted today that operations would continue without external support. tensions between the two nations have escalated since the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden inside pakistan. reports in britain now say former prime minister gordon brown was one of the victims of phone hacking by a tabloid newspaper "news of the world". the rupert murdoch media conglomerate has closed the paper. and it delayed efforts today to take over another company, british sky broadcasting or, b- sky-b. we have a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: gordon brown wooed the murdoch empire like the best of them. but they turned on him, backing david cameron in the last election. today, he turned on them. gordon brown believes his phone and that of his wife may have been hacked into by the "news of the world." he believes someone working on behalf of the "sunday times"
warned there would be harsh punishment for anyone found guilty of negligence in the sinking. in pakistan, intelligence officials reported u.s. drone aircraft, firing missiles, killed at least 42 suspected militants in less than 24 hours. four missile strikes targeted sites in tribal areas near the afghan border, beginning late monday night. u.s. and pakistani relations have been increasingly tense since the raid that killed osama bin laden. a u.s. army ranger was awarded the nation's highest military award, the medal of honor, today for heroism in afghanistan. during a fight in 2008, sergeant first class leroy petry was shot in both legs and lost his right hand when he tried to throw back an enemy grenade. his actions saved two other rangers. president obama presented the medal at a white house ceremony this afternoon. later, outside the white house, petry said all of the troops serving overseas are heroes. >> whenever you have a chance or opportunity to thank them, check them, give them a pat on the back for the job they've done because they've earned it. that's the british award any se
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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